Author Topic: Preventing stock damage  (Read 406 times)

Ericb

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Preventing stock damage
« on: January 10, 2018, 06:38:55 PM »
I thought that I had seen instructions on this site for reinforcing the head of the stock on the 219/220s. I searched but don't see the info now.  If there is a technique, would someone share it?  I'd like to shoot my 20 gauge but haven't yet, due to some hairline cracks in my stock. 

Thanks in advance!

Garnett

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Re: Preventing stock damage
« Reply #1 on: January 10, 2018, 06:57:37 PM »
Ericb, For just small cracks I use a good epoxy glue and compress  the cracks together until dry.  Then I spread a thin coat of epoxy on the inside of the stock to reinforce from that location.  For larger cracks, after I have done the glue inside and out, I drill a small hole from the bottom side through the crack or cracks, but do not penetrate the top of the stock if not necessary, and insert a small steel pin, and glue this in place.  I counter sink the pin so that I can cover the hole with walnut (or other wood, which may require staining before mixing with glue) dust mixed with glue.  When this dries, I dress up the area and apply a small spot of oil finish.  Most times it is hardly noticeable.  So many repairs are done with wood screws and I personally feel this is not a good place to use them.  I hope others will share their repair methods for these stocks.  That is a weak spot in the design.  I have seen .22 Hornet stocks cracked.  Of course, someone could have shot a 12 gauge barrel on that action.  Another thought, if a stock is so badly cracked it has to be replaced, if you install a semi-inleted stock, leave the wood extra thick where it contacts the metal.  See page 94 of my first book and page 158 of my revised edition for a picture of this.  Also, I suggest if you have a stock that is not cracked, that before you shoot the gun, remove the stock and glass bed the inside to prevent future cracking.  I hope this will help.

Ericb

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Re: Preventing stock damage
« Reply #2 on: January 11, 2018, 07:34:09 AM »
Thanks.  Sounds like a good plan.  The cracks are very small so hopefully there won’t be any need for the drill and pin method.

Ericb

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Re: Preventing stock damage
« Reply #3 on: January 11, 2018, 08:34:32 AM »
One other thing:  the opening lever on my gun has to go a full 90 degrees to the right to break the gun.  Is that normal?  I don’t think the last one I owned had to go that far.

Garnett

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Re: Preventing stock damage
« Reply #4 on: January 11, 2018, 08:50:02 AM »
90 degrees does seem excessive.  While several of my guns that show little use, are very difficult to open, none of the top levers have to travel that far.  Maybe someone else has a similar gun?

Cleetus

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Re: Preventing stock damage
« Reply #5 on: January 11, 2018, 09:04:27 AM »
One other comment on cracking stocks and inletting stocks with draw bolt type attachments. The very front of the stock where it flanges under the edges of the receiver should touch evenly but should not be the main load bearing surface absorbing recoil. I had a CSM Rbl side by side that cracked loose at that point because they use a similar design and the stock had been inletted very poorly. The factory told me that the main bearing surface should be at the back inside where the drawbolt goes through the stock below the safety tang. Makes sense as the wood is thicker at that point. The RBL actually had a very slight gap at the back so the only bearing surface was at the head where it tucked into the receiver. Make sure that the drawbolt area is touching but not just at the surface edges or corners where the top and bottom start to curve or they will wedge it open like a splitting axe. As Garnett points out, glass bedding paying particular attention to the drawbolt area should work.

Garnett

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Re: Preventing stock damage
« Reply #6 on: January 11, 2018, 10:19:26 AM »
Cleetus, Thanks for your input.  I discuss proper stock fit on page 281 of my revised edition.   You information is an addition to what my local gunsmith has advised.  It really does make sense to have the main point of contact on the rear of the action. 

Ericb

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Re: Preventing stock damage
« Reply #7 on: January 13, 2018, 08:37:15 AM »
I’ve decided not to do anything with my 220.  It’s all original now, it’s unlikely I’ll ever hunt with it or take it shooting, and I don’t want to risk ruining the stock permanently.