Author Topic: Looking for answers concerning the age of my Model 220 12 gauge.  (Read 2611 times)

SDAL

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Picture of my firearm.










« Last Edit: October 24, 2022, 01:42:27 PM by SDAL »

Garnett

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Re: Looking for answers concerning the age of my Model 220 12 gauge.
« Reply #1 on: October 24, 2022, 12:05:26 PM »
You have an early "striker" fired model as opposed to later "internal hammer" models.  The numbers/symbols you show inside the action are assembly numbers.  If these same or very similar symbols are found under the barrel in front of the lug, and stamped into the stock under the butt plate, this is an indication of an all original gun as it left the factory.  Where was your gun made?  The barrel should be marked, possibly, "Utica, N.Y."  I can be more specific once I know where your gun was made.  Thanks for posting and welcome to our forum!

SDAL

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Re: Looking for answers concerning the age of my Model 220 12 gauge.
« Reply #2 on: October 24, 2022, 01:03:10 PM »
The markings under the butt plate are the same as the others. Also included picture of the side of barrel with the address on it. From what you said on another post, my trigger guard appears to be alloy.





« Last Edit: October 24, 2022, 01:19:01 PM by SDAL »

Garnett

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Re: Looking for answers concerning the age of my Model 220 12 gauge.
« Reply #3 on: October 24, 2022, 04:26:41 PM »
After looking at all your pictures, I feel that you have what I call a "2nd Model Utica".  The 1st Model Uticas had a steel trigger guard, and a slim trigger.  You are correct, saying your guard is an alloy.  They were painted black over bare metal, with no primer coat.  You also have a color case hardened receiver.  This CC procedure did not start until after the production was moved to Chicopee Falls in 1947.  At some point at Chicopee Falls, the "B" suffix models started with the internal hammer.  It is my opinion that the Utica barrel was moved to Chicopee Falls and assembled as a complete gun at that time.  I have seen a few other early guns with the CC receivers.  The picture does not show, but do you have a steel or alloy safety button?  The very early ones are steel.  A weak point in the design of these guns is that stocks tend to crack where they meet the receiver.  I strongly suggest glass bedding the inside of the stock before shooting it.  Also, I suggest removing the stock bolt and cleaning the threads as needed, and put some grease on the threads.  This will prevent it rusting to the frame.  Thanks for sharing your gun with us.  It is of a far better quality than so many other single barrel shotguns on the market today.

SDAL

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Re: Looking for answers concerning the age of my Model 220 12 gauge.
« Reply #4 on: October 24, 2022, 07:24:26 PM »
Enclosed is picture of the safety button. It is alloy.
I really do not have plans to shoot this gun. It has been many years since I have shot it. It does have a very strong kick.
Please explain what you mean by bedding the stock.
With what you have given me so far, I think this gun may be made between 1947 and the very early 50's.
Thank you for all of the information that you have given.


Garnett

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Re: Looking for answers concerning the age of my Model 220 12 gauge.
« Reply #5 on: October 24, 2022, 07:50:23 PM »
Try touching a magnet to your safety button.  It has all the shapes of the early steel ones.  I have compared your picture to the steel and alloy safeties in my parts and I believe yours to be an early steel one.  Glass bedding, is taking a very small amount of fiber glass and putting a very thin coat on the raw unfinished wood on the inside of the stock.  Once dry, it is very hard and resists cracking.  It is best done when a new stock is fitted and you must be very careful putting  release agent on the metal so the glass will not stick to it.  This is an over simple explanation.  Try googling "Glass bedding a gun stock".  I am glad to help in any way I can.  Best wishes, Garnett

SDAL

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Re: Looking for answers concerning the age of my Model 220 12 gauge.
« Reply #6 on: October 25, 2022, 01:19:22 AM »
I did as you suggested and checked the safety button with a magnet. It is defiantly made of alloy.
The videos of glass bedding are interesting.

Garnett

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Re: Looking for answers concerning the age of my Model 220 12 gauge.
« Reply #7 on: October 25, 2022, 07:07:07 AM »
I will have another look at my safety buttons. 

Garnett

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Re: Looking for answers concerning the age of my Model 220 12 gauge.
« Reply #8 on: November 15, 2022, 12:58:25 PM »
Well, surprise, surprise!  I have in my parts bin, 7 early "steel" style safeties.  I would have bet anyone, they are all steel.  However, one of them, that is slightly different from all the rest, failed the magnet test.  It is not steel, but an alloy.  Note, the hole does not go all the way through, but it is drilled from both sides.  My guess is that the change to alloy from steel in this early style safety, must have been right before the safety style was changed.