Author Topic: 220 question  (Read 2212 times)

TXTROUT66

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220 question
« on: April 10, 2022, 10:54:08 AM »
How common are the early 220s with the duck scene on the underside of the action?


« Last Edit: April 10, 2022, 10:55:57 AM by TXTROUT66 »

Garnett

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Re: 220 question
« Reply #1 on: April 10, 2022, 01:58:47 PM »
The factory engraved or acid etched models are not very common.  I have been researching these Savage M219/220's for about 12 years and have found 3 different styles of factory engraving.  One style for the "Trap" models, which is found on both sides of the frame.  Another style, for the otherwise common guns, found only on the bottom of the frames, as you picture in your posting.  I purchased one (the only example I have seen) that has the same style engraving found on early Savage 1899 rifles, and some Savage double barrel shotguns.  Of 45 different guns I purchased for research for my book, only 7 of them are engraved.  I have copies of all catalogs from 1937 to 1967 and "engraved" models are not listed.

TXTROUT66

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Re: 220 question
« Reply #2 on: April 10, 2022, 08:42:21 PM »
Thank you for the help.

This is on a 16 gauge. Seems to be a full choke 28" barrel. Interesting thing is the butt stock is like a rifle stock with flutes and the fore stock looks to be from a later gun. The butt stock is so full of old oil I'm going to have to try and use alternate rounds of heat and acetone to see if I can pull it out. It currently is almost black from oil.

The action looks like it was originally blued and not case hardened from pulling the butt stock. Where the acid etched actions normally blued?

To go along with the game scene, it also has the + mark on the side of the action.
« Last Edit: April 10, 2022, 09:15:48 PM by TXTROUT66 »

Garnett

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Re: 220 question
« Reply #3 on: April 11, 2022, 12:33:01 PM »
The early, prewar guns, have the same stock as the rifles, but the forearms are larger for the shotguns.  Yes, the etched receivers like yours were blued.  I have not seen any later guns made after the move from Utica after WWII, that were etched.  Could you send a picture of your forearm please?

When I was writing my first edition to my book on the M219/220's, I had a list of all the markings I had observed and I asked Mr. Callahan, the Savage Historian, if he would interpret them for me for a fee.  He answered in one word, "NO!"  So we may never know what the "+" mark and many others are.  I recently found one with a German "Maltese" type cross on it.

TXTROUT66

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Re: 220 question
« Reply #4 on: April 11, 2022, 08:58:46 PM »
Here is a picture of the butt stock and fore end. I am confident that the fore end is not original. It looks to be about 60 years newer. The butt stock is heavily oil soaked and the fore end is in really nice shape and doesn't match the age of the shotgun. Always possible that things got switched around between firearms in the past. Looks to be the correct style, just not the right age.





I'll continue to see how much of the oil I can get out with a heat gun and acetone soaks. It is.ligjt compared tonthe black I started with...

Garnett

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Re: 220 question
« Reply #5 on: April 11, 2022, 11:01:45 PM »
Thanks for the pictures.  Very rarely, forearm wood was stamped inside with assembly numbers matching the barrel and frame, and stock.  Does yours have any numbers or letters?  Please keep up posted.

TXTROUT66

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Re: 220 question
« Reply #6 on: April 13, 2022, 07:58:19 AM »
The only think in this forearm is a former owner's scratched in initials.